The Senate Just Legalized The Sale Of Your Browsing History

The Senate voted 50-48 to do away with broadband privacy rules; allowing ISPs and telecoms to sell your internet history.

Caleb Chen
MintPress News

Despite widespread disapproval from constituents, S.J.Res 34 has passed the United States Senate with a vote of 50-48, with two absent votes. Earlier, at 12:25 Eastern March 23, 2017, the US Senate voted on S.J.Res 34, and will use the Congressional Review Act to strip away broadband privacy protections that kept Internet Service Providers (ISPs) and telecoms from selling your internet history and app data usage to third parties.

S.J.Res 34 was first introduced by 23 Republican Senators earlier this month and its blitz approval is a giant blow to privacy rights in the United States.

The resolution, which is now effectively half passed, will hand responsibility of broadband privacy regulation from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and disallow the FCC from making any rules protecting Internet privacy ever again. Continue reading “The Senate Just Legalized The Sale Of Your Browsing History”

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Judge Rejects Settlement Over New York Police Department’s Surveillance of Muslims

Matt Apuzzo & Adam Goldman The New York Times A federal judge has rejected the settlement of a lawsuit stemming from the New York Police Department’s surveillance of Muslims, saying the proposed deal does not provide enough oversight of an agency that he said had shown a “systemic inclination” to ignore rules protecting free speech and religion. In January, Mayor Bill de Blasio, a Democrat, agreed to … Continue reading Judge Rejects Settlement Over New York Police Department’s Surveillance of Muslims

Facial Recognition Threatens Privacy of All Americans

Fiona Miller Infowars A coalition of over 50 civil liberties groups sent a letter to the Justice Department’s civil rights division calling for a “safeguards” to ensure that facial recognition software is being used accurately and fairly.  Police departments and other government coalitions have been using facial recognition software more often in recent years. However, there is currently no way to regulate government use of these … Continue reading Facial Recognition Threatens Privacy of All Americans

Forget typing: Computers that can read your MIND and convert your thoughts into text are on their way

Abigail Beall The Daily Mail Computers that can read our minds might enhance the capabilities of already existing speech interfaces with devices, like Siri and Ok Google. But it could be even more important for those with speech difficulties, and even more so for patients who lack any speech or motor function at all. ‘So instead of saying “Siri, what is the weather like today” … Continue reading Forget typing: Computers that can read your MIND and convert your thoughts into text are on their way

Head of U.S. police chiefs apologizes for historic mistreatment of minorities

Tom Jackman The Washington Post The president of America’s largest police organization on Monday issued a formal apology to the nation’s minority population “for the actions of the past and the role that our profession has played in society’s historical mistreatment of communities of color.” Terrence M. Cunningham, the chief of police in Wellesley, Mass., delivered his remarks at the convention in San Diego of the … Continue reading Head of U.S. police chiefs apologizes for historic mistreatment of minorities

For Eight Months A Private Company Flew Secret Surveillance Missions Over Baltimore

Derrick Broze The Activist Post Baltimore police recently held a press conference announcing new details regarding secret surveillance flights taking place over the city for eight months. Baltimore Police have released new details on a controversial partnership between law enforcement and a private company that operates a fleet of surveillance planes. At a press conference last Friday Baltimore Police released flight logs for the plane owned and … Continue reading For Eight Months A Private Company Flew Secret Surveillance Missions Over Baltimore

Cops often abuse confidential databases to snoop on romantic partners, journalists and celebrities

The Associated Press DENVER — Police officers across the country misuse confidential law enforcement databases to get information on romantic partners, business associates, neighbors, journalists and others for reasons that have nothing to do with daily police work, an Associated Press investigation has found. Criminal-history and driver databases give officers critical information about people they encounter on the job. But the AP’s review shows how … Continue reading Cops often abuse confidential databases to snoop on romantic partners, journalists and celebrities

After New York Attack, Congress Wants TSA to Secure Amtrak, Buses

A bill pushing the agency to focus more on surface transport follows a critical report and an attempted bombing near a train station.

Bloomberg

The U.S. Transportation Security Administration is one of those federal agencies that tends to inspire intense reactions among the traveling public. It’s a bureaucracy that interacts with millions of passengers each day, requiring their shoes, jackets, laptops—and time.

Virtually all this occurs at airports, with about 80 percent of the agency’s $7.4 billion budget spent on aviation security. Only 2 percent of the TSA’s funding goes to surface transportation, according to a report by the Office of Inspector General earlier this month. Congress is looking to change that.

Several U.S. senators want the TSA to focus more attention and resources on rail, highway, and marine transportation, which would mean greater security oversight at such places as Amtrak stations and Megabus coach stops. A bipartisan bill introduced Thursday by Senator John Thune (R-S.D.) would require the TSA to use a risk-based security model for these transport modes and to budget money based on those risks. It would require a wider use of the agency’s terrorist watch list by train operators and more detailed passenger manifests along with tighter screening of marine employees. The legislation also would increase the TSA’s canine use by as many as 70 dog-handler teams for surface transportation. Continue reading “After New York Attack, Congress Wants TSA to Secure Amtrak, Buses”

A Walking Tour of New York’s Massive Surveillance Network

Cora Currier
The Intercept

EARLIER THIS MONTH, on the 15th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, the lower tip of Manhattan was thronged with soldiers in uniform, firefighters marching with photos of lost friends pinned to their backpacks, and tourists bumbling around the new mall at the World Trade Center. Firetrucks and police cars ringed Zuccotti Park and white ribbons adorned the iron fence around the churchyard on Broadway. Trash cans were closed up, with signs announcing “temporary security lockdown.”

So it felt a bit risky to be climbing up a street pole on Wall Street to closely inspect a microwave radar sensor, or to be lingering under a police camera, pointing and gesturing at the wires and antenna connected to it. Yet it was also entirely appropriate to be doing just that, especially in the company of Ingrid Burrington, author of the new book “Networks of New York: An Illustrated Field Guide to Urban Internet Infrastructure,” which points out that many of the city’s communications and surveillance programs were conceived and funded in response to the attacks. Continue reading “A Walking Tour of New York’s Massive Surveillance Network”