Miami Judge Says Compelling Password Production Isn’t A Fifth Amendment Issue

TechDirt

Another small dart has been lodged in the thigh of the Fifth Amendment by the courts. A Miami, FL federal judge has ruled that defendants in a sex video extortion case must turn over their phones’ passwords.

In a case being closely watched in legal and tech circles, Miami-Dade Circuit Judge Charles Johnson ruled that Hencha Voigt, and another man charged with being her accomplice, must unlock phones police believe were used in a plot to extort a social-media celebrity.

He ruled that unlocking their phones would not violate their constitutional right against self-incrimination.

“For me, this is like turning over a key to a safe deposit box,” Johnson said.

Continue reading “Miami Judge Says Compelling Password Production Isn’t A Fifth Amendment Issue”

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The Senate Just Legalized The Sale Of Your Browsing History

The Senate voted 50-48 to do away with broadband privacy rules; allowing ISPs and telecoms to sell your internet history.

Caleb Chen
MintPress News

Despite widespread disapproval from constituents, S.J.Res 34 has passed the United States Senate with a vote of 50-48, with two absent votes. Earlier, at 12:25 Eastern March 23, 2017, the US Senate voted on S.J.Res 34, and will use the Congressional Review Act to strip away broadband privacy protections that kept Internet Service Providers (ISPs) and telecoms from selling your internet history and app data usage to third parties.

S.J.Res 34 was first introduced by 23 Republican Senators earlier this month and its blitz approval is a giant blow to privacy rights in the United States.

The resolution, which is now effectively half passed, will hand responsibility of broadband privacy regulation from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and disallow the FCC from making any rules protecting Internet privacy ever again. Continue reading “The Senate Just Legalized The Sale Of Your Browsing History”