Self-driving cars could soon be cheaper and easier to build

Roberto Baldwin Engadget There’s no shortage of companies working on artificial intelligence for cars. If anything there’s a glut. Every automaker and startup seems to be building a nearly sentient system designed to operate cars and avoid objects (especially humans). AImotive (pronounced “AI Motive” — yeah, it’s confusing) is doing the same thing, except it’s also designing the accompanying hardware. What’s more, it’ll play nice … Continue reading Self-driving cars could soon be cheaper and easier to build

More Robots, Fewer Jobs

Mira Rojanasakul & Peter Coy Bloomberg Are you about to be replaced by a robot? The question has broad implications for the U.S. economy, especially the manufacturing sector. Industries that robotize tend to increase output. But robots can have dire consequences for workers. Two economists recently concluded that both jobs and wages fall in parts of the U.S. where more robots are installed. The March … Continue reading More Robots, Fewer Jobs

The Military is Using Human Brain Waves to Teach Robots How to Shoot

Patrick Tucker
DefenseOne

Modern sensors can see farther than humans. Electronic circuits can shoot faster than nerves and muscles can pull a trigger. Humans still outperform armed robots in knowing what to shoot at — but new research funded in part by the Army may soon narrow that gap.

Researchers from DCS Corp and the Army Research Lab fed datasets of human brain waves into a neural network — a type of artificial intelligence — which learned to recognize when a human is making a targeting decision. They presented their paper on it at the annual Intelligent User Interface conference in Cyprus in March.

Why is this a big deal? Machine learning relies on highly structured data, numbers in rows that software can read. But identifying a target in the chaotic real world is incredibly difficult for computers. The human brain does it easily, structuring data in the form of memories, but not in a language machines can understand. It’s a problem that the military has been grappling with for years. Continue reading “The Military is Using Human Brain Waves to Teach Robots How to Shoot”

The robotic brain surgeon will see you now: drill can perform complex procedures 50 times faster

Henry Bodkin
The Telegraph

Scientists have revealed a robotic drill that can cut the most sensitive brain surgery down from two hours to two and a half minutes.

The machine, developed at the University of Utah, is being hailed as a potential breakthrough in survival for brain patients as the reduced time they spend in surgery will drastically cut the chances of infection. Continue reading “The robotic brain surgeon will see you now: drill can perform complex procedures 50 times faster”

International Workers’ Day: Profitable Work Will Be Automated, The Rest Will Be Left to Us

Charles Smith
Of Two Minds

Everyone wants an abundance of “good paying” jobs, but employers can only afford to pay employees if the work being done is profitable.

What’s abundant and what’s scarce? The question matters because as economist Michael Spence (among others) has noted, value and profits flow to what’s scarce.What’s in over-supply has little to no scarcity value and hence little to no profitability.

Continue reading “International Workers’ Day: Profitable Work Will Be Automated, The Rest Will Be Left to Us”

Mind hacking: Scientists want new laws to stop our thoughts from being stolen

RT

Researchers have called for radical new legislation protecting people’s thoughts from being stolen and maybe even deleted.

Biomedical ethicists Marcello Ienca and Roberto Andorno believe that while rapid advances in neurotechnology have created opportunities in modern medicine, they also present new challenges for human privacy. Continue reading “Mind hacking: Scientists want new laws to stop our thoughts from being stolen”

Walt Disney World plans to deploy driverless shuttles in Florida

Russ Mitchell The Los Angeles Times Walt Disney World in Florida appears poised to launch the highest-profile commercial deployment of driverless passenger vehicles to date, testing a fleet of driverless shuttles that could cart passengers through parking lots and around its theme parks. According to sources with direct knowledge of Disney’s plans, the company is in late-stage negotiation with at least two manufacturers of autonomous … Continue reading Walt Disney World plans to deploy driverless shuttles in Florida

Robot dog makes first parcel delivery to house in Boston

Cara McGoogan
The Telegraph

Boston Dynamics has been putting its robotic dog to work delivering packages in Boston as it part of a mission to find commercial uses for the machine.

The company, owned by Google, has been testing ways to use the dexterous machines in different settings. Until now, the robots have only really been used in military settings.

Called Spot, the four-legged version of Boston Dynamics‘ automaton can jump, run, climb stairs, get back up if it falls, and perform human tasks such as house work. It can also now deliver packages strapped to its back, the company said.  Continue reading “Robot dog makes first parcel delivery to house in Boston”

Google Kicks Off $100 Million Project In Predictive Medicine; Seeks 10,000 Volunteers For Invasive Screening

Jason Erickson
NaturalBlaze

Predictive medicine – or “precision health” as it is sometimes known – is a trend in healthcare that is growing exponentially. Perhaps the greatest indication to date that this is slated to be the future of disease prevention and patient care is a massive new investment by tech behemoth and king of the algorithm, Google.

However, in order to continue along the path toward true predictive modeling, there will need to be a group of people willing to be tracked and monitored to a never-before-seen degree. And herein also lies some concern about what the future will look like if all of our most intimate functions are logged and analyzed for inspection by the central computers of Google and the healthcare State.

People might not know, but Google is not only synonymous with online browsing and search engines; it has a health division called Verily.  It is the result of an undertaking that began in 2014 as Google Life Sciences and has become one of the company’s most intricate and far-reaching endeavors. None more so than the specific mission to predict future illness. Verily’s bold mission has now been given a name: Project Baseline. Preliminary estimates put the price tag near $100 million. Continue reading “Google Kicks Off $100 Million Project In Predictive Medicine; Seeks 10,000 Volunteers For Invasive Screening”

The Dark Secret at the Heart of AI

MIT Technology Review Last year, a strange self-driving car was released onto the quiet roads of Monmouth County, New Jersey. The experimental vehicle, developed by researchers at the chip maker Nvidia, didn’t look different from other autonomous cars, but it was unlike anything demonstrated by Google, Tesla, or General Motors, and it showed the rising power of artificial intelligence. The car didn’t follow a single … Continue reading The Dark Secret at the Heart of AI