Sports stadiums spy on everyone’s instant messages, Tweets and sentiments

Mass Private I

A recent article in Motherboard reveals how sports stadiums are spying on everyone’s instant messages, Tweets and sentiments. (I couldn’t find any pictures of a U.S. sport stadium security room, so I posted one of a 2014 World Cup security room.)

Sports stadiums across the country are using ‘Babel Street’ and ‘Babel X’ to spy on fan’s sentiments and social media accounts.

“The FBI recommended that Seattle Police reach out to San Francisco PD to learn more about how they used it when nearby Santa Clara hosted Super Bowl 50.”

According to the article, the Seattle Seahawks and Carolina Panthers also use Babel Street to spy on fans.

Continue reading “Sports stadiums spy on everyone’s instant messages, Tweets and sentiments”

Fears Google Hire could allow employers to see your entire search history

News.com.au IN THIS day and age, every boss is going to quickly Google a prospective employee before asking them to come in for an interview. But now the technology giant is working on project called Google Hire, which The Sun reports will help employers learn perhaps a little bit too much about their new recruits. It will reportedly be a recruitment tool similar to LinkedIn … Continue reading Fears Google Hire could allow employers to see your entire search history

Scrutiny Intensifies on the Warrantless Collection of Americans’ Communications

MIT Technology Review

Civil Liberties advocates call for more transparency around a controversial foreign surveillance law that Congress must decide whether to reauthorize this year.

The controversy around the communications between Donald Trump’s associates and Russian officials before he became president is highlighting something civil liberties advocates particularly dislike about the government’s foreign surveillance practices: when it spies on foreigners it believes to be overseas, which it can do without probable cause, it also sweeps up plenty of information pertaining to Americans. Continue reading “Scrutiny Intensifies on the Warrantless Collection of Americans’ Communications”

Wikileaks Unveils ‘Vault 7’: “The Largest Ever Publication Of Confidential CIA Documents”; Another Snowden Emerges

Video by Lisa Haven Article by ZeroHedge WikiLeaks has published what it claims is the largest ever release of confidential documents on the CIA. It includes more than 8,000 documents as part of ‘Vault 7’, a series of leaks on the agency, which have allegedly emerged from the CIA’s Center For Cyber Intelligence in Langley, and which can be seen on the org chart below, … Continue reading Wikileaks Unveils ‘Vault 7’: “The Largest Ever Publication Of Confidential CIA Documents”; Another Snowden Emerges

A Walking Tour of New York’s Massive Surveillance Network

Cora Currier
The Intercept

EARLIER THIS MONTH, on the 15th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, the lower tip of Manhattan was thronged with soldiers in uniform, firefighters marching with photos of lost friends pinned to their backpacks, and tourists bumbling around the new mall at the World Trade Center. Firetrucks and police cars ringed Zuccotti Park and white ribbons adorned the iron fence around the churchyard on Broadway. Trash cans were closed up, with signs announcing “temporary security lockdown.”

So it felt a bit risky to be climbing up a street pole on Wall Street to closely inspect a microwave radar sensor, or to be lingering under a police camera, pointing and gesturing at the wires and antenna connected to it. Yet it was also entirely appropriate to be doing just that, especially in the company of Ingrid Burrington, author of the new book “Networks of New York: An Illustrated Field Guide to Urban Internet Infrastructure,” which points out that many of the city’s communications and surveillance programs were conceived and funded in response to the attacks. Continue reading “A Walking Tour of New York’s Massive Surveillance Network”

We Just Found out the Real Reason the FBI Wants a Backdoor into the iPhone

Source – The Antimedia

(ANTIMEDIA) The FBI versus Apple Inc. An unstoppable force meets an immovable object the feverish momentum of American technocracy accelerating into the cavernous Orwellian entrenchment of the surveillance state. You thought the patent wars were intense? The ‘Battle of the Backdoor’ pits one of America’s most monolithic tech conglomerates against the Department of Justice and, ultimately, the interests of the national security state. And this case is likely only the opening salvo in what will be a decades-long ideological war between tech privacy advocates and the federal government.

On its face, the case boils down to a single locked and encrypted iPhone 5S, used by radical jihadist Syed Rizwan Farook before he and his wide Tashfeen Malik killed 14 people in San Bernardino on December 2nd. The DOJ wants Apple to build a backdoor into the device so that it can bypass the company’s state of the art encryption apparatus and access information and evidence related to the case. Continue reading “We Just Found out the Real Reason the FBI Wants a Backdoor into the iPhone”

NY lawmakers want teachers trained to spot students with mental health issues

Source – The New York Daily News

ALBANY — A pair of state lawmakers from Brooklyn are looking to make teachers the “first line of defense” in combatting mental health problems among students.

Assemblyman Marcus Crespo and Sen. Jesse Hamilton plan to unveil legislation Monday that will require teachers to be instructed in “mental health first aid” to better spot students with problems and help them obtain treatment.

“We think this is a way to enhance our outreach and our ability to identify youth that may need mental health services,” Crespo told the Daily News. “What better way than to have that first line of defense in our schools.” Continue reading “NY lawmakers want teachers trained to spot students with mental health issues”

Paris Terror Attacks: More Proof That Mass Surveillance Does NOT Work

In the wake of the recent Paris terror attacks, it would be tempting to give in to our instincts. To once again limit our own freedoms. To allow the government still greater control over our lives. To allow them to watch over us… or to just watch us. To give in to fear.

When bad guys rear their ugly heads, we assume that government mass surveillance will keep us warm, comfy and safe… but is this true? Let us look at their track-record before we leap into the fire.

Right after France’s 2014 Charlie Hebdo terror attack, Edward Snowden pointed out that mass-surveillance programs don’t work because they are “burying people under too much data”. Indeed, just a year before the attack, France had imposed one of the harshest and most intrusive surveillance laws in the entirety of Europe which would allow them to collect boatloads of data. Continue reading “Paris Terror Attacks: More Proof That Mass Surveillance Does NOT Work”

France Has A Powerful and Controversial New Surveillance Law

As it plans its response to a series of six terrorist attacks Friday night that killed 129 and injured 352, the government of France will likely step up its efforts to keep tabs on the movements and communications of people within its borders.

As it happens, the attacks have occurred only a few months after legislators in that country passed a sweeping new surveillance law that gives the government broad powers to closely monitor the mobile phone and Internet communications of French citizens. Continue reading “France Has A Powerful and Controversial New Surveillance Law”